NEW: $400,000 matching gift challenge – Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

NEW: $400,000 matching gift challenge – Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Your support can go twice as far.

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You can makeTWICE the difference.
$35 ? $70
$60 ? $120
$120 ? $240
DONATE NOW

Dear Zoltan,
I’m thrilled to announce another special opportunity for your support to go twice as far. You play a key role in our effort to end Alzheimer’s disease. So I hope you’ll take advantage of this chance to DOUBLE your impact in the fight against this deadly disease.
The Pine Family Foundation of Austin, Texas, has generously pledged $400,000 to the Alzheimer’s Association if we can raise that same amount by June 30. Their gift will support research initiatives that have the potential to slow the trajectory of Alzheimer’s.
This matching gift challenge means that you can make twice the impact on the millions of people affected by Alzheimer’s by helping to provide care and support services and advance critical research.
Your donation of $35 can become $70, a gift of $60 can become $120, or your especially generous gift of $120 can become $240.
Alzheimer’s is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. It is also the nation’s largest unaddressed public health crisis.
That’s why your support during this limited-time opportunity is so critical. Your generosity can go twice as far to fight this escalating crisis. Please help us make this matching gift challenge a success with your donation today. Thank you.

Team Up today! – Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Team Up today! – Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

The Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Illinois Chapter invites you to Team Up Against Alzheimer’s. This is a student-focused fundraiser designed to promote brain health, spread awareness and raise funds through student-coordinated events or activities. It is flexible enough to be an on-going effort or a one-time occurrence and aims to motivate young people to get involved in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

Team Up Against Alzheimer’s

The Alzheimer’s Association®, Greater Illinois Chapter invites you to Team Up Against Alzheimer’s. This is a student-focused fundraiser designed to promote brain health, spread awareness and raise funds through student-coordinated events or activities. It is flexible enough to be an on-going effort or a one-time occurrence and aims to motivate young people to get involved in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.
Who can participate?

Anyone can form a team. Whether it’s a sports team, a club, a class or a group of friends–everyone can help in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.
When does this event take place?

“Team Up” fundraisers can occur anytime during the school year. Depending on the group hosting, the fundraisers can coincide with athletic events, school functions, holidays, etc.
What is the level of involvement?

The type and number of activities your team hosts, are completely up to you! You can even create your own!
Click here for a list of activities to help you get started.

Why it’s important for younger generations to act now

The earlier we educate people about this disease, the better chance we have at preventing it, fighting it, and even curing it. Teaching students to recognize symptoms helps increase the number of early diagnoses and become better prepared for the emotional and financial burdens as the disease progresses. As this issue becomes more prominent throughout people’s lives, it may encourage them to donate or participate in studies to help advance research. It can inspire young people to take a vested interest in a global issue, partake in community service or pursue careers in science, medicine, healthcare, or public policy to help the cause. The cure for this disease may even lie in one of the minds of today’s youth!
Questions? Please contact Sari Eilon at seilon@alz.org or 847.779.6952.
Whether you’re an athlete or a fan, you are the MVP in the fight against Alzheimer’s!

Planning ahead can help with the financial costs of Alzheimer’s disease – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Planning ahead can help with the financial costs of Alzheimer’s disease – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Alzheimer’s can take a financial toll on the person living with the disease and their family. Putting legal, financial and end-of-life plans in place is one of the most important steps a person with Alzheimer’s can take. It allows them to participate in making decisions that help family and friends know their wishes.

Planning Ahead

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It’s important for everyone to plan for the future, but legal plans are especially important for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. The sooner planning starts, the more the person with dementia may be able to participate.

Why plan ahead?

Find a Clinical Trial

More than 250 research studies pertaining to Alzheimer’s and dementias are underway. Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch lets you search these trials quickly and easily. Find a trial.

Making legal plans in advance is important for several reasons: Early planning allows the person with dementia to be involved and express his or her wishes for future care and decisions. This eliminates guesswork for families, and allows for the person with dementia to designate decision makers on his or her behalf. Early planning also allows time to work through the complex legal and financial issues that are involved in long-term care.

Legal planning should include:

  • Making plans for health care and long-term care
  • Making plans for finances and property
  • Naming another person to make decisions on behalf of the person with dementia
Legal capacity

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Legal capacity is the ability to understand and appreciate the consequences of one’s actions and to make rational decisions. In most cases, if a person with dementia is able to understand the meaning and importance of a given legal document, he or she likely has the legal capacity to execute (to carry out by signing) it.

The requirements of legal capacity can vary from one document to another. A lawyer can help determine what level of legal capacity is required for a person to sign a particular document.

Before a person with dementia signs a legal document:

  • Talk with the person.
    Find out if the person with dementia understands the legal document and the consequences of signing it. Make sure the person knows what is being explained and what he or she is being asked to do.
  • Ask for medical advice.
    If you have concerns about the person’s ability to understand, ask for medical advice. A doctor may be able to assist in determining the level of a person’s mental ability.
  • Take inventory of existing legal documents.
    Verify whether living wills, trusts and powers of attorney were signed before the person was diagnosed. The person may no longer remember having completed them. Even if legal documents were completed in the past, it is important to review them with another person for necessary corrections and/or updates.

Help Is Available

Need additional information about “Managing Someone Else’s Money?” Download the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s free, four-part guide.

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Meeting with a lawyer

You can complete certain legal documents without a lawyer, but getting legal advice and services from an attorney who specializes in elder law can be especially helpful.

If you already have a lawyer, he or she may be able to refer you to an attorney that specializes in elder law. Otherwise, there are several resources available to help you locate elder law services in your community. Learn more.

If you meet with a lawyer, be sure to discuss these three key issues and any other concerns you may have:

  1. Options for health care decision making for the person with dementia
  2. Options for managing the person’s personal care and property
  3. Possible coverage of long-term care services, including what is provided by Medicare, Medicaid, veteran benefits and other long-term care insurance

Gather all documents relating to the assets of the person with dementia ahead of time so you can bring them to your appointment.

Checklist: What to Bring to the Lawyer

  • Itemized list of assets (e.g., bank accounts, contents of safe deposit boxes, vehicles, real estate, etc.), including current value and the names listed as owners, account holders and beneficiaries
  • Copies of all estate planning documents, including wills, trusts and powers of attorney
  • Copies of all deeds to real estate
  • Copies of recent income tax returns
  • Life insurance policies and cash values of policies
  • Long-term care insurance policies or benefits booklets
  • Health insurance policies or benefits booklets
  • Admission agreements to any health care facilities
  • List of names, addresses and telephone numbers of those involved, including family members, domestic partners and caregivers, as well as financial planners and/or accountants
Five quick tips
  1. Those named in the power of attorney document should have a copy of and access to the original document.
  2. The person with dementia should name a successor (back-up) agent for power of attorney in the event that the agent may one day be unable to act.
  3. The person with dementia should decide if the agent with power of attorney for health care has authority to consent to a brain autopsy. This may vary according to state law.
  4. Once a power of attorney for health care document and/or a signed living will is in place, give a copy to the person’s physicians and other health care providers.
  5. Consider choosing an attorney or a bank to manage the individual’s estate if the person lacks a trusted individual with the time or expertise.

Help Is Available

Do you need assistance locating an elder law attorney? Start with these resources:

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Top Resources

Together, we can tackle Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Together, we can tackle Alzheimer’s – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Register today for RivALZ: Blondes vs. Brunettes, where two teams of women divided to reflect rivalries come together to compete in a flag football game to inspire fundraising, awareness and action in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. We need dedicated players, coaches and spectators. It’s time to pick a side and help tackle Alzheimer’s!

Olympian’s gold medal was for his mother living with Alzheimer’s – – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Olympian’s gold medal was for his mother living with Alzheimer’s – – Optimum Senior Care – Chicago In Home Caregivers

Track and field athlete Jeff Henderson took first place in the long jump at the 2016 Summer Olympics, bringing the gold medal home to his mother, who is living with Alzheimer’s disease. He writes about his mindset during the games: “No one was going to beat me. In my head, it was all for my mom.”

Winning a gold medal last August in the 2016 Olympics is a moment I will never forget. I wanted to go home that night. All I could think was: “I need to get back to Arkansas. I need to fly home to see my mom.” Of course there were two more weeks to spend in Rio after my event – and the closing ceremonies to attend – but all I could think about was being at home with Mom. Everything I’ve done has been for her.

My mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s 11 years ago, when I was 17 years old. I’m the youngest of six kids, and she always did everything for the entire family, as so many mothers do. She cooked and cleaned and was always ironing and folding my shirts for me. She showed her love through all of those everyday things she did for all of us. My father – who is now her caregiver – was working long hours, so she was the one raising me every day.

I remember the signs.

I remember her cooking meals and then forgetting to finish preparing them. Sometimes she would leave dinner behind to burn or be recooked later. I remember her staying out late and getting lost. There were so many little things that started to become bigger issues.

It was hard watching this happen, because Mom was always there for me. She took me to my football practices and supported me at all my track and field meets. She would scream so loud at my meets that I could hear her over everyone; there was never a time I didn’t hear her. She would do anything for anyone – that was just the type of person she was.

I remember one day in high school when I came home and I saw how badly Mom’s hands were shaking. It was just weeks after she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I could already see how sick she was getting. For the first couple of years after her diagnosis, it was rough for me, not really having anyone to talk to about the situation. It was hard just to focus at school.

Luckily, my brother was there. I don’t know what I would’ve done without him.  He told me that Mom had told him everything she wanted us to do. He said: “Jeff, she told me to tell you that you have to finish school.” I remember crying for almost an hour. My eyes were bloodshot, all red. Didn’t they know how hard it was for me to comprehend all of this? I didn’t know where to turn, or who to talk to.

I rarely tell anyone what’s going on in my life; I am naturally quiet and tend to keep things to myself. But I do know that awareness needs to be brought to Alzheimer’s disease, so I will continue to raise awareness of this disease by sharing my family’s story. I want people to tell me their own stories. I want to keep the lines of communication open. When we talk about how we are facing this disease, it helps us feel less alone.

My mindset during the Olympics in Rio was that no one was going to beat me. In my head, it was all for my mom. “I will not lose. I will win gold for her. I can control this moment, and make it mine.” I focused and worked hard, worrying about no one but myself in the moment of competition. It took a whole lot to get to that point, but I did. And I won.

I feel like I am winning every day. I take after my mother, I hope. I am a nice person who cares about everyone. I will talk to someone living on the streets, offer money or help, and give my blessings – that’s how I cope with my situation. I continue to help others as my mom would.

I’m the first man from the U.S. to win gold in the long jump since 2004 and I’m looking forward to pushing myself even further, focusing on sprinting before the next summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020. I know I can do it. To the naysayers, I say: “Just watch me. I will do it.”

My mom continues to inspire me. Every day, she still fights through the disease, with my dad by her side. I am so happy she is alive, and that I could bring the gold back to her and place it in her hands. That is all that matters. Mom taught me to keep on fighting, and that is what I encourage other people dealing with this disease to do, whether you’re the child, spouse or friend of a person with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Talk to each other, support each other and stay grounded. You aren’t alone.

About the Author: Raised in McAlmont, Arkansas, Jeff Henderson is an American track and field athlete. Jeff took first place with an 8.38 meter leap in the long jump at the 2016 Summer Olympics, bringing home a gold medal to his mother. Jeff encourages anyone in the midst of an Alzheimer’s diagnosis to find someone to talk to. Follow him on social media via Facebook and Twitter.